Farewell to my Sigma 10-20mm

A while back, I picked up a Sony A7ii. I’d been toying with the idea of getting a new camera for a while, and the price was right. This came with the challenging task of acquiring new lenses for this system. This also means that I will be shrinking my current collection of equipment.

While I like my Nikon gear (not yet updated), I won’t miss too much of it. The move to a mirrorless system has downsides like reduced battery time, and inherent lag in the electronic viewfinder, but the A7ii’s body is smaller and lighter, and the low-light performance is miles ahead of the D7000.

One thing I will miss is my Sigma 10-20mm f3.5 EX DC HSM lens. It’s been my daily driver since I got it four years ago. I loved that perspective distortion, especially on a cloud day, as the clouds often seem to lead in towards the centre of the picture.

Obviously, at that focal range, this lens is designed for landscape use, but  I really found it interesting to take on the street. It allowed me to take photos of people and give the photo some context.

DSC_9538-HDR
Standing right behind my buddy Chris at the Kerid crater in Iceland with the Sigma 10-20mm. Even so close, you get heaps of context in the photo.

I suppose I could hang on to it, but I don’t think I’ll be keeping a Nikon body just for one lens. It is quite heavy, and the D7000 has a magnesium frame. One of the strengths of the Sony ILC system is that there are a lot of lens mount adaptors. I’ve tried it with the 10-20, but since it’s designed for a cropped sensor, and the A7ii is full-frame, I lose a lot of the frame. I can’t justify it.

Bulbous
No filter is going to sit on that monster!

I’ve already bought the Samyang 14mm f/2.8 as a replacement. It will definitely perform better in my astro shots, which I desperately need. Even so, the bulb on the front is unattractive, and makes it difficult to look after this lens. I’ve toted the Sigma all over the world. It’s climbed mountains and photographed glaciers. I’m not sure how keen I’d be to do that with the Samyang.

So, I’ve had to say goodbye to a friend who has travelled to every country I’ve been to in the last four years, bar one. We’ve seen amazing things together: the Northern Lights, Tori gates in Japan, mountains and seascapes. I will definitely miss it. If you shoot on an cropped-sensor camera, then I highly recommend picking one up for yourself.